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Communication Talk

As children, we learn to communicate naturally by trial and error. Where the Wild Things Are, by Maurice Sendak, gives us a perfect example when Max’s mother calls him “WILD THING!” and Max says, “I’LL EAT YOU UP!” At that point, she sends Max to bed without his supper. Then, as we often do, he sails off in his dreams to another land where Wild Things live. He creates a rumpus until he tires of playing and tells the Wild Things, “Now stop!” Having his boat anchored back home where he is loved and where he can now smell dinner, Max decides to sail back home.

Eternity-Based Leadership

It is no secret that I’ve focused much of my life on results-based leadership, which, as I walk more closely with Jesus, doesn’t seem to be biblical. Often this pull for results comes from my deep desire to be found worthy in my job. I desire to be considered a bargain—pulling more than my weight and contributing significantly. Yet, as I read Scripture today, I find something different.

Spiritual Formation as a Leader

We all have opportunities to lead and to follow, and in both cases, our spiritual formation makes a difference in how we treat one another in those roles. 

The Bible says that God knew us while we were in our mother’s womb and that He knows our days—including every experience we’ve had. So, often with gaping wounds, we limp into positions of leadership. We want to present ourselves to everyone as a whole person, and we hope that they won’t notice our bandages and scars. Yet the more we try to hide our wounds, the more we expose them.

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